Survey Results: What People Think About Facebook And Social Media.

amandaricks.com/survey-results-fb-social-media/

The results are in from our survey asking you what your thoughts were in regards to Facebook and in particular the recent changes. Also, what is your favourite social media platform? First, thank you to everyone who participated. Your involvement is very much appreciated. I’d like to go over some background information about the survey … Read more

Instagram Just Got A Lot Easier With New Dimensions!

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Great news, I think so anyway. Instagram is now no longer constricted by square only images. They have opened up their image dimensions to now include landscape AND portrait sizes! What a relief, no more making specialty sized images for just one platform. Yeah, I’m lazy that way. Here, from Dustn.TV is an updated infographic with … Read more

Are Our Minds Being Hijacked?

amandaricks.com/minds-being-hijacked/

This is an ‘Articles via Amanda’ where I feature snippets of interesting, unique, and or particularly well-written articles from the web to you for your interest, discussion and further reading. These snippets all have their properly links and attributions. I hope you find this article as thought-provoking as I did.

Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attention

by  in San Francisco

Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. In August, the 34-year-old tech executive took a more radical step to restrict his use of social media and other addictive technologies.

Rosenstein purchased a new iPhone and instructed his assistant to set up a parental-control feature to prevent him from downloading any apps.

A decade after he stayed up all night coding a prototype of what was then called an “awesome” button, Rosenstein belongs to a small but growing band of Silicon Valley heretics who complain about the rise of the so-called “attention economy”: an internet-shaped around the demands of an advertising economy.

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